• Arizona Contractor & Community

NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION AWARENESS MONTH: Work Risks That Lead To Higher Suicide Rates

The Second of a Four-Part Series


Working in the building and construction industry is a demanding profession. There are tremendous production expectations on the workers in order to fulfill deadlines, as well as working circumstances that may frequently be hazardous if rigorous safety rules are not followed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that male workers that work in construction have a 65% higher rate than all U.S male workers. According to the same report, there are various work-related risk factors that are taking their toll on construction workers in the worst way imaginable.


While further study is required to understand these work-related factors, CDC indicates that suicide risk is related to the following:

  • low skilled labor

  • lower education

  • relative low

  • socioeconomic status

  • access to lethal means

  • job stress

  • poor supervision and colleague support

  • low job control

  • job insecurity

The report indicates those working in the physical position in construction are at higher risk for suicide. Research studies as well as experts working with mental health in construction industries show that these factors are the main cause of mental health problems that lead to suicide for construction workers.

While the death by suicide puts an emotional toll in the families of the affected, it has a substantial effect in the economy, affecting the government, employers and the decease’s family.